LilacSat-1 Codec 2 in Space!

On May 25th LilacSat-1 was launched from the ISS. The exiting news is that it contains an analog FM to Codec 2 repeater. I’ve been in touch with Wei Mingchuan, BG2BHC during the development phase, and it’s wonderful to see the satellite in orbit. He reports that some Hams have had preliminary contacts.

The LilacSat-1 team have developed their own waveform, that uses a convolutional code running over BPSK at 9600 bit/s. Wei reports a MDS of about -127 dBm on a USRP B210 SDR which is quite respectable and much better than analog FM. GNU radio modules are available to support reception. I think it’s great that Wei and team have used open source (including Codec 2) to develop their own novel systems, in this case a hybrid FM/digital system with custom FEC and modulation.

Now I need to get organised with some local hams and find out how to work this satellite myself!

Part 2 – Making a LilacSat-1 Contact

On Saturday 3 June 2017 Mark VK5QI, Andy VK5AKH and I just made our first LilacSat-1 contact at 12:36 local time on a lovely sunny winter day here in Adelaide! Mark did a fine job setting up a receive station in his car, and Andy put together the video below showing both ends of the conversation:

The VHF tx and UHF rx stations were only 20m apart but the path to LilacSat-1 was about 400km each way. Plenty of signal as you can see from the error free scatter diagram.

I’m fairly sure there is something wrong with the audio (perhaps levels into the codec), as the decoded Codec 2 1300 bit/s signal is quite distorted. I can also hear similar distortion on other LilicSat-1 contacts I have listened too.

Let me show you what I mean. Here is a sample of my voice from LilacSat-1, and another sample of my voice that I encoded locally using the Codec 2 c2enc/c2dec command line tools.

There is a clue in this QSO – one end of the contact is much clearer than the other:

I’ll take a closer look at the Codec 2 bit stream from the satellite over the next few days to see if I can spot any issues.

Well done to LilacSat-1 team – quite a thrill for me to send my own voice through my own codec into space and back!

Part 3 – Level Analysis

Sunday morning 4 June after a cup of coffee! I added a little bit of code to codec2.c:codec2_decode_1300() to dump the energy quantister levels:

    e_index = unpack_natural_or_gray(bits, &nbit, E_BITS, c2->gray);
    e[3] = decode_energy(e_index, E_BITS);
    fprintf(stderr, "%d %f\n", e_index, e[3]);

The energy of the current frame is encoded as a 5 bit binary number. It’s effectively the “AF gain” or “volume” of the current 40ms frame of speech. We unpack the bits and use a look up table to get the actual energy.

We can then run the Codec 2 command line decoder with the LilacSat-1 Codec 2 data Mark captured yesterday to extract a file of energies:

./c2dec 1300 ~/Desktop/LilacSat-1/lilacsat_dgr.c2 - 2>lilacsat1_energy.txt | play -t raw -r 8000 -s -2 - trim 30 6

The lilacsat1_energy.txt file contains the energy quantiser index and decoded energy in a table (matrix) that I can load into Octave and plot. I also ran the same text on the reference cq_freedv file used in Part 2 above:

So the top plot is the input speech “cq freedv ….”, and the middle plot the resulting energy quantiser index values. The energy bounces about with the level of the input speech. Now the bottom plot is from the LilacSat-1 sample. It is “red lined” – hard up against the upper limits of the quantiser. This could explain the audio distortion we are hearing.

Wei emailed me overnight and other Hams (e.g. Bob N6RFM) have discovered that reducing the Mic gain on the uplink FM radios indeed improves the audio quality. Wei is looking into in-flight adjustments of the gain between the FM rx and Codec 2 tx on LilacSat-1.

Note to self – I should look into quantiser ranges to make Codec 2 robust to people driving it with different levels.

Part 4 – Some Improvements

Sunday morning 4 June 11:36am pass: Mark set up his VHF tx in my car, and we played the cq_freedv canned wave file using a laptop and signalink so we could easily vary the tx drive:

Fortunately I have plenty of power available in my Electric Vehicle – we just tapped across 13.2V worth of Lithium cells in the rear pack:

We achieved better results, but not quite as good as using the source file directly without a journey through the VHF FM uplink:

LilacSat-1 3 June high mic gain

LilacSat-1 4 June low mic gain

encoded locally (no VHF FM uplink)

There is still quite a lot of noise on the decoded audio, probably from the VHF uplink. Codec 2 performs poorly in the presence of high levels of background noise. As we are under-deviating, the SNR of the FM uplink will be reduced, further increasing noise. However Wei has just emailed me that his team is reducing the “AF gain” between the VHF rx and Codec 2 on LilacSat-1 so we should hear some improvements on the next few passes.

Note to self #2 – add some noise reduction inside of Codec 2 to make it more robust to different input signal conditions.

Links

The LilacSat-1 page has links to GNU Radio modules that can be used to receive signals from the satellite.

Mark, VK5QI, describes he car’s exotic antennas system and how it was used on todays LilacSat-1 contact.

LilacSat-1 HowTo, Mark and I have documented the set up procedure for LilacSat-1, and written some scripts to help automate the process.

2 thoughts on “LilacSat-1 Codec 2 in Space!”

  1. Very impressive David. Last pass (4 June17 2115Z over US), after Harbin team adjustments, audio seemed about the same. Will stay with “low” mic gain for now and 10W (or less) tx PWR.
    Enjoying the bird including the results of your work.

    Thanks!!

    73,
    Bob
    N6RFM

    1. Fine Business Bob – your audio is sounding great. Yes it’s a fun project, kind of cool to speak over a satellite using software I wrote to compress my own voice!

      It’s also a testament to Ham radio and open source: GNU Radio, codec 2, and Hams all sharing results to tune the system.

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