Engage the Silent Drive

I’ve been busy electrocuting my boat – here are our first impressions of the Torqueedo Cruise 2.0T on the water.

About 2 years ago I decided to try sailing, so I bought a second hand Hartley TS16; a popular small “trailer sailor” here in Australia. Since then I have been getting out once every week, having some very pleasant days with friends and family, and even at times by myself. Sailing really takes you away from everything else in the world. It keeps you busy as you are always pulling a rope or adjusting this and that, and is physically very active as you are clambering all over the boat. Mentally there is a lot to learn, and I started as a complete nautical noob.

Sailing is so quiet and peaceful, you get propelled by the wind using aerodynamics and it feels like like magic. However this is marred by the noise of outboard motors, which are typically used at the start and end of the day to get the boat to the point where it can sail. They are also useful to get you out of trouble in high seas/wind, or when the wind dies. I often use the motor to “un hit” Australia when I accidentally lodge myself on a sand bar (I have a lot of accidents like that).

The boat came with an ancient 2 stroke which belched smoke and noise. After about 12 months this motor suffered a terminal melt down (impeller failure and over heated) so it was replaced with a modern 5HP Honda 4-stroke, which is much quieter and very fuel efficient.

My long term goal was to “electrocute” the boat and replace the infernal combustion outboard engine with an electric motor and battery pack. I recently bit the bullet and obtained a Torqeedo Cruise 2kW outboard from Eco Boats Australia.

My friend Matt and I tested the motor today and are really thrilled. Matt is an experienced Electrical Engineer and sailor so was an ideal companion for the first run of the Torqueedo.

Torqueedo Cruise 2.0 First Impressions

It’s silent – incredibly so. Just a slight whine conducted from the motor/gearbox pod beneath the water. The sound of water flowing around the boat is louder!

The acceleration is impressive, better than the 4-stroke. Make sure you sit down. That huge, low RPM prop and loads of torque. We settled on 1000W, experimenting with other power levels.

The throttle control is excellent, you can dial up any speed you want. This made parking (mooring) very easy compared to the 4-stroke which is more of a “single speed” motor (idles at 3 knots, 4-5 knots top speed) and is unwieldy for parking.

It’s fit for purpose. This is not a low power “trolling” motor, it is every bit as powerful as the modern Honda 5HP 4-stroke. We did a A/B test and obtained the same top speed (5 knots) in the same conditions (wind/tide/stretch of water). We used it with 15 knot winds and 1m seas and it was the real deal – pushing the boat exactly where we wanted to go with authority. This is not a compromise solution. The Torqueedo shows internal combustion who’s house it is.

We had some fun sneaking up on kayaks at low power, getting to within a few metres before they heard us. Other boaties saw us gliding past with the sails down and couldn’t work out how we were moving!

A hidden feature is Azipod steering – it steers through more than 270 degrees. You can reverse without reverse gear, and we did “donuts” spinning on the keel!

Some minor issues: Unlike the Honda the the Torqueedo doesn’t tilt complete out of the water when sailing, leaving some residual drag from the motor/propeller pod. It also has to be removed from the boat for trailering, due to insufficient road clearance.

Walk Through

Here are the two motors with the boat out of the water:

It’s quite a bit longer than the Honda, mainly due to the enormous prop. The centres of the two props are actually only 7cm apart in height above ground. I had some concerns about ground clearance, both when trailering and also in the water. I have enough problems hitting Australia and like the way my boat can float in just 30cm of water. I discussed this with my very helpful Torqueedo dealer, Chris. He said tests with short and long version suggested this wasn’t a problem and in fact the “long” version provided better directional control. More water on top of the prop is a good thing. They recommend 50mm minimum, I have about 100mm.

To get started I made up a 24V battery pack using a plastic tub and 8 x 3.2V 100AH Lithium cells, left over from my recent EV battery upgrade. The cells are in varying conditions; I doubt any of them have 100AH capacity after 8 years of being hammered in my EV. On the day we ran for nearly 2 hours before one of the weaker cells dipped beneath 2.5V. I’ll sort through my stock of second hand cells some time to optimise the pack.

The pack plus motor weighs 41kg, the 5HP Honda plus 5l petrol 32kg. At low power (600W, 3.5 knots), this 2.5kWHr pack will give us a range of 14 nm or 28km. Plenty – on a huge days sailing we cover 40km, of which just 5km would be on motor.

All that power on board is handy too, for example the load of a fridge would be trivial compared to the motor, and a 100W HF radio no problem. So now I can quaff ice-cold sparkling shiraz or a nice beer, while having an actual conversation and not choking on exhaust fumes!

Here’s Matt taking us for a test drive, not much to the Torqueedo above the water:

For a bit of fun we ran both motors (maybe 10HP equivalent) and hit 7 knots, almost getting the Hartley up on the plane. Does this make it a Hybrid boat?


We are in love. This is the future of boating. For sale – one 5HP Honda 4-stroke.

3 thoughts on “Engage the Silent Drive”

  1. It was a great day out on the water, that electric outboard is the *real* deal. Now you’ve got me thinking if I can do something similar with my Duncanson 23…

  2. Hi David,

    Neat :). If I understand what your are saying. 1000W of electricity gives the same performance as a “5HP” gas engine.

    Seems like the 5HP engine is no where near delivering 5HP!!

    Impressive article.

    Lots of fun :).


    1. Well the 5HP is “peak” power however you rarely run them at full throttle. But yes, both motors are equivalent in performance.

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