Band Pass Filter and Power Amplifier for Simple HF Data

Is it possible to move data over HF radio using very simple, low cost hardware and clever SDR software? In the last few posts (here and here) I’ve been constructing and testing building blocks for a simple HF data terminal. This post describes a few more, a 3-8 MHz Band Pass Filter (BPF) and 1W Power Amplifier (PA).

Band Pass Filter

The RTL-SDR samples at 28.8 MHz, capturing a broad chunk of spectrum. In direct mode we just sample the Q-channel, so any energy above 14.4 MHz will be aliased into our passband; e.g. both 21 and 7 MHz will appear as a 7 MHz sampled signal.

In the previous post we determined the ADC overloads at -30dBm, so we want to remove any strong signals above or near that level. One source of strong signals is broadcast band AM radio between 500 to 1600 kHz.

The use case is “100 mile” data links so I’d like the receiver to work on the 80M (3.5 MHz) as well as 40M (7.1 MHz) bands, which sets the BPF passband at 3 to 8 MHz. I hooked up my spec-an to a 40M antenna and could see AM broadcast signals peaking at -40dBm, so I set a BPF specification of > 20dB attenuation at 1.5 MHz to keep the sum of all those signals well away from the -30dBm limit. At the high frequency end I specified at > 30dB attenuation at 21 MHz, to reduce any energy aliased down to 7 MHz.

I designed a cascaded High Pass Low Pass/Filter using some tables from my ancient (but still excellent) copy of “RF Circuit Design”, by Chris Bowick. The Octave rtl_sdr script does the calculations for me. A spreadsheet would work well too.

I simulated the BPF using LTSpice, fixed a few bugs, and tweaked it for real world component values. Here is the circuit and frequency response on log and linear scales:



I soldered up the BPF Manhattan style using commercial axial 1uH inductors and ceramic capacitors, then tested it using the spec-an and tracking generator (note linear scale):

The table at the bottom shows the measured attenuation at some important frequencies. The attenuation is a bit low at 21 MHz, perhaps due to the finite Q of the real world inductors. Quite a good match to the LTSpice simulation and close enough for my experiments. The little step at around 10 MHz is a tracking generator artefact.

The next plot shows the effect of the BPF when my spec-an is connected to my 40M dipole (0 to 10MHz span). Yellow is the received signal without the filter, purple with the filter.

The big spike around 0 Hz is an artefact on the spec-an. The filter is doing a good job of nailing the AM broadcast band energy. You can see a peak around 7.4 MHz where the dipole is resonant. Actually this is a bit of a surprise to me, as I want it resonant around 7.2MHz, I better check that out! At 7.2-ish the insertion loss (difference between the purple and yellow) is a few dB as per the tracking generator plot above. It’s more like 6dB at 7.4 MHz (the dipole peak), not quite sure why. An insertion loss of 3dB at 7.2 MHz is OK for my application.

Power Amplifier

A few weeks ago I hooked the rpitx to my 40M dipole and managed to demodulate the 11mW signal a few km away (over an urban channel) using a mag loop and my FT-817. I decided to build a small 1W PA to make the system usable over “100 mile” HF channels. The actual power is not that critical, as we can trade power off against bit rate. For example if a given HF channel supports 100 bit/s at 1W, we then know we can get 1000 bit/s at 10W.

Even low bit rates can be very useful if you have no other communication. A text message or Tweet, allowing for some overhead, averages about 1000 bits. So at 1000 bit/s you can send 1 txt per second, 3600 an hour, or 86,000/day. That’s very useful communication if you are in a disaster situation and want to tell family you are alive. Or perhaps live in a remote area with no other communication. Of course HF channels come and go, so the actual throughput will be less than that.

I explored the junk box and found a partially constructed Beach 40. I isolated the driver and PA stage and poked it with my signal generator. Turns out it had a bit too much gain (the rpitx has plenty of drive) so I ended up with this simple PA circuit:



The only spurious output I can see is the 2nd harmonic is at -44 dBC, meeting ACMA specs:

The low pass filter at the output has a 3dB point at about 10 MHz which is a little high. It could be brought down a little to increase stop-band attenuation and reduce the 2nd harmonic further. I haven’t done anything about impedance matching the input, as it hits 1W (30dBm) output with 14dBm drive from the rpitx. The 1 inch square heatsink is quite warm after 10 minutes but I can still hold it. It’s not very efficient, 2.9W DC input power for 1W out, however 16dB power gain is quite good for a PA. Anyhoo, it’s a fine starting point for my experiments, we can optimise the PA later if necessary.

Next Steps

OK, so I have most of the building blocks I need for some over the air HF data experiments. There was a bit of engineering involved in building the BPF and PA, but the designs are very simple and can be constructed for a few $ or even from road kill (recycled) components. We now have a very low cost HF data radio, running high performance modems, connected to a Linux computer and Wifi.

Next I will put some software together to estimate data throughput, set the system up with real antennas, and gather some experimental results over real world HF channels.

Reading Further

Rpitx and 2FSK, first part in this series.
Testing a RTL-SDR with FSK on HF, second part in this series.
rtl_sdr.m script that calculates component values for the BPF.

2 thoughts on “Band Pass Filter and Power Amplifier for Simple HF Data”

  1. Hi David,

    Most impressive.

    I look at all the non-message traffic on FT8 and realize that a simple system at 1 BPS, the FT8 rate, could most probably allow chat type SMS type messages worldwide in otherwise closed bands. A sort of super CW mode.

    To me beginning the ‘contact’ with a ‘ping’ responder giving level and error rate would also easily allow antenna and algorithm research. I suspect many closed bands are not closed at all, but quite useable and would give the ability to easily talk with a remote end with a low rate protocol.

    I further wonder if many HF paths are actually reflected by some high electron count point not actually in the usual straight line path model.

    As always, your posts are very inspirational :).

    John Concord, NH

  2. Hmm, I just noticed my NooElec dongle has a solder pad on pin 4 for direct sampling. It’s still pretty small though… (click on my name for the pic)

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